Top 5 most awe inspiring and humbling space photos

Have a look at alienstudy.com’s top 5 awe inspiring and humbling space photos to help you wonder about where it all came from and what is still out there.

 

5. The sunset on Mars

Mars Sunset

Mars Sunset

A seven month journey all the way to Mars was endured by the Mars Rover Spirit. The Spirit’s mission was to find evidence of water in the Gusev Crater which was created ages ago by an asteroid or comet impact. This beautiful photo of a sunset on Mars was taken by the Mars Rover on its way to Gusev from the location known as Husband Hill. Check out this video of the sunset on Mars as captured by the Mars Rover Curiosity.

4. Earth from the Moon

Earth photo taken from the moon by Apollo Astronauts

Earth photo taken from the moon by Apollo Astronauts

So that is what earth looks like from 384,400km away. A sight the greater majority of humans will only be able to see on photographs, at least for another couple of years. So let us hope that NASA will keep sharing. This photograph of the earth as taken from the moon is a sight every astronaut dreams of being able to witness first hand. This particular photo was taken from the Apollo 8 spacecraft as it came out from behind the moon. An interesting fact about observing the Earth from the moon is that one would observe phases of the Earth as you would of the moon observing from the Earth.

3. Earth and Moon taken by Juno on the way to Jupiter

Earth and Moon taken by Juno on the way to Jupiter

Earth and Moon taken by Juno on the way to Jupiter

On its way to Jupiter the Juno spacecraft had to make a passing of Earth one final time to get a boost in speed. It was on 9 October 2013 that Juno made the flyby and got this magnificent photo of the Earth and its natural satellite as it approached. It was taken by low resolution cameras which are mounted to one of the spacecraft’s solar-array arms. These cameras are actually used for determining the orientation of magnetic sensors equipped to Juno. One has to wonder though, who else or what else has seen this sight except man and it’s engineering.

2. Our Sun

The Sun

The Sun

This powerful looking ball is the Earth’s source of heat and light and we call it the Sun. The Sun to us is much more than just a distant star we gaze at, at night. Our Sun has been classified as a yellow dwarf star and it is our source of life, when it goes, we go. The Earth is about 150 million kilometres away from the Sun and scientist say that distance is just about as close as we want to be to the sun. Earth’s orbit around the Sun is at a specific distance from the Sun we can refer to as the sweet spot. Any closer or further away from the Sun and temperatures on earth would have been unbearable. Our Sun is a gigantic mass of hydrogen and helium and makes out more than 99% of our solar system’s mass. The chemical reaction of hydrogen and helium sets of 1 trillion megaton bombs every second on the Sun. That is pretty powerful for something that is more than 4.5 billion years old, so its middle aged. Scientists estimate that the Sun will last about another 7 billion years and that when it dies, it will be a spectacular show. Pity we won’t be there to see it.

1. Billions of galaxies in one small area of the sky

Billions of galaxies in a small patch of sky

Billions of galaxies in a small patch of sky

What is out there? Are we alone? Isn’t that the first thoughts to come to mind when you see a picture like this? Can this be real? According to the Hubble Space Telescope it is. This is just one of many images the Hubble Space telescope can show us of what is out there. Galaxies and galaxies and galaxies in different shapes and sizes. Earth is located in the Milky Way galaxy which is thought to have between 200 and 400 billion stars. This is just in one galaxy! Astronomers suggest that there is something like 176 billion galaxies in the universe. How many stars is that and how many earth-like planets could be orbiting these stars and how many of those earth-like planets contain life?
If a galaxy is just stars, gas and dust held together by gravity, how can it be this picturesque?

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